Scripture Readings for Sunday, September 17, 2017 Not By the Numbers

First Reading:
Psalm 103:1-12
Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all that is within me, bless his holy name. Bless the Lord, O my soul, and do not forget all his benefits – who forgives all your iniquity, who heals all your diseases, who redeems your life from the Pit, who crowns you with steadfast love and mercy, who satisfies you with good as long as you live so that your youth is renewed like the eagle’s. The Lord works vindication and justice for all who are oppressed. He made known his ways to Moses, his acts to the people of Israel. The Lord is merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love. He will not always accuse, nor will he keep his anger forever. He does not deal with us according to our sins, nor repay us according to our iniquities. For as the heavens are high above the earth, so great is his steadfast love toward those who fear him; as far as the east is from the west, so far he removes our transgressions from us. 

Second Reading:
Matthew 18:21-35
Then Peter said to Jesus, “Lord, how many times should I forgive my brother or sister who sins against me? Should I forgive as many as seven times?” Jesus said, “Not just seven times, but rather as many as seventy-seven times. Therefore, the kingdom of heaven is like a king who wanted to settle accounts with his servants. When he began to settle accounts, they brought to him a servant who owed him ten thousand bags of gold. Because the servant didn’t have enough to pay it back, the master ordered that he should be sold, along with his wife and children and everything he had, and that the proceeds should be used as payment. But the servant fell down, kneeled before him, and said, ‘Please, be patient with me, and I’ll pay you back.’ The master had compassion on that servant, released him, and forgave the loan. “When that servant went out, he found one of his fellow servants who owed him one hundred coins. He grabbed him around the throat and said, ‘Pay me back what you owe me.’ “Then his fellow servant fell down and begged him, ‘Be patient with me, and I’ll pay you back.’ But he refused. Instead, he threw him into prison until he paid back his debt. “When his fellow servants saw what happened, they were deeply offended. They came and told their master all that happened. His master called the first servant and said, ‘You wicked servant! I forgave you all that debt because you appealed to me. Shouldn’t you also have mercy on your fellow servant, just as I had mercy on you?’ His master was furious and handed him over to the guard responsible for punishing prisoners, until he had paid the whole debt. “My heavenly Father will also do the same to you if you don’t forgive your brother or sister from your heart.”

Message by Pastor Mary Dotson

Picture is from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Unmerciful_Servant_(The_Parables_of_Our_Lord_and_Saviour_Jesus_Christ)_MET_DP835790.jpg

Artist Creator:Dalziel Brothers
John Everett Millais (1829–1896) Link back to Creator infobox template wikidata:Q159606
Title The Unmerciful Servant (The Parables of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ)
Description
Print; Prints
Date 1864
Medium Wood engraving; proof on India paper
Dimensions
image: 5 1/2 x 4 5/16 in. (13.9 x 10.9 cm)
sheet: 7 5/16 x 6 1/16 in. (18.6 x 15.4 cm)
Current location
Metropolitan Museum of Art Link back to Institution infobox template wikidata:Q160236
Drawings and Prints
Accession number 21.68.4(6)
Credit line Rogers Fund, 1921
Source/Photographer
http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/382271
This file was donated to Wikimedia Commons by as part of a project by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. See the Image and Data Resources Open Access Policy
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Permission
(Reusing this file)
Creative Commons CC-Zero This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.
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